History of OSA / Shatford Centre

 
2012
2017
2016
2015
2013
2012
2011
2010
2010
2009
2007
2006
2004
2002
1981
1966
1961
1960
1959
1921
2012

2012

Shatford Centre wins the Thompson Okanagan Commercial Building Awards honour for Commercial Renovation / Restoration in 2012. Architect: Chris Allen, AIBC, LEED, AP. General Contractor: Greyback Construction. Project Supervisor: Samarpan Faasse, Okanagan School of the Arts. he Shatford Centre receives award for the renovation of the building

2017

2017

In May Mother Earth was donated to the Shatford Centre by artist Petronella van den berg and her husband on their leaving Penticton for Eastern Canada.
Resurgence Exhibition, curated by Dr Michelle Jack and Ann Doyon Second opened June 21st ,the second annual joint Aboriginal Day celebration of the Okanagan School of the Arts and the En’owkin Centre. Also featured was an exhibition of photos of elders from the Okanagan Nation communities (Okanagan Indian Band, Upper Nicola Band, Westbank First Nation, Penticton Indian Band, Osoyoos Indian Band, Lower and Upper Similkameen Indian Bands) and historical photos of the past.

2016

2016

Crossing the River: Supporting Creative Reconciliations exhibit, curated by Robyn Kruger, Greg Younging and Kayleigh Hall, opened on Aboriginal Day, June 21st, 2016 at the Shatford Centre. The Shatford Centre and the En’owkin Centre, an Indigenous post-secondary arts and cultural center located on the Penticton Indian Reserve, endeavour to strengthen and connect Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities in Penticton using art and culture as a way to heal and repair historical divisions.

2015

2015

Construction of Rotary Community Learning Kitchen. In July, sculptures Mother Earth and Day Leaning Into Night by Petronella van den berg, an artist from the Netherlands who had made her home in Naramata, find a temporary home at the Shatford Centre.

2013

2013

Shatford Chronicles Summer Edition announces the publication of Penticton Inside-Out map, designed by Larry Hunter, as a fund raiser for the Okanagan School of the Arts, Shatford Centre. There is a colourful character map on one side and a Penticton street map on the other.

2012

2012

Pen High 100th Reunion, Shatford becomes headquarters. The celebration was held May 18 and 19, 2012

2011

2011

Shatford Centre opens at the Spirit Festival February 21-26th ,2011 giving the public a long-awaited preview of the Shatford Building in operation in it’s new role as an entrepreneurial arts centre.
The range of creative activities offered included drumming classes from Bobby Bovenzi, script and song writing, dance, culinary arts and painting. In June The Okanagan School of the Arts began its programming and administration of the building.

2010

Federal funding announced

2010

2010

Phase I renovations allowed the Shatford Centre to be opened to the public. Renovations included an elevator, new front stairs and entrance, new washrooms, upgrade of the electrical system and repair of the auditorium. Publication of the first Shatford Chronicles – Winter 2010 edition.

2009

2009

Representatives from 16 local arts and cultural groups came together to develop a plan for the Shatford and voted to have the Okanagan School of the Arts take lead in acquiring the Senator Shatford building.

2007

2007

Listed on the Canadian Register of Historic July 23, 2007. A symbolic temple of learning, it represents the civic pride and optimism with which the City of Penticton has stimulated and encouraged generations of growth. Character -defining elements include historic maple trees and the unique stone perimeter wall which create a sense of place by enclosing the two schools and establishing their pre-eminence on Main Street

2006

2006

The Ellis and Shatford buildings of Pen High campus are formally recognized as historic sites May 1, 2006.

2004

2004

City of Penticton and School District 67 agree to save the Shatford and Ellis buildings; Shatford for community use and incorporating Ellis School building into new Pen High school.

2002

2002

The school expands its programing to include year-round classes.

1981

1981

Venture: The Story of The Okanagan Summer School of the Arts 1960-1981 by Jean Webber
(1981) details the diligence and dedication of the many people that took the Okanagan Summer School of the Arts from a once amateur effort to being recognized in Canada and the Pacific Northwest.

1966

1966

The name of the school was officially changed to “Okanagan Summer School of the Arts”, December 20, 1966. Some notable instructors for the 1966 session were Leonard Camplin- Band, Frances Hatfield- Pottery and Paul St. Pierre- Writing.

1961

1961

June 1961, the “Okanagan Summer School of Fine Arts” became a Society, a decision that was seen as an act of faith in the future of the school. The 1961 Summer School brochure stated:
Born of a dream, nurtured by enthusiasm, developed by dedication- this is the story of the “Okanagan Summer School of the Arts”.
W.O. Mitchell was the main attraction of the faculty teaching the Creative Writing class and attracting professional writers.

1960

1960

The “Okanagan Summer School of Fine Arts” established for students of all ages and levels of proficiency officially opened July 8, 1960 on the Pen High campus with George Gay appointed Art School Director. The school offered a variety of courses in music, creative writing, dance, drama and visual arts.
The main speaker for the opening was Lister Sinclair who also taught the Creative Writing course.

1959

1959

Following a visit to Banff Frank Laird, Mayor of Penticton, very impressed with the Banff School of Fine Arts, purposed the idea of a similar school for Penticton to the members of the Board of Trade. They were very responsive and a special committee was set up to explore the idea with the UBC Department of Extension with Penticton as a regional base for the school. At this time the Penticton Community Arts Council and an organization which was to become the Okanagan-Mainline Regional Arts Council were formed to establish a coordinating support for the Arts with Eva Cleland leading both

1921

1921

Senator Shatford School was built to accommodate Jr. High classes, one of only five schools in the province at the time to offer grades 7-8- & 9. The building, named after the recently deceased former Member of the Legislative Assembly in British Columbia and later Senator Lytton Shatford was judged to be one of the finest and most up-to-date school buildings in the province.

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